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Why I support Bitcoin Classic

I'm the developer of bitaddress.org. I like to share my thoughts on the recent Fee Event. I have come to believe Bitcoin is more about people and our values than about code.
Bitcoin's vision in the whitepaper is explicitly about P2P cash. It wasn't labeled an interbank settlement system.
The original client was an all-in-one Windows application for your desktop PC. You could mine with your CPU. Send and receive payments with a wallet. Relay transactions and store the full blockchain.
We've drifted from the original optimistic and idealistic vision of Satoshi. The Genesis block made a statement about the banks and monetary policy by quoting a prominent newspaper headline in the financial center of the world, London. Satoshi's answer was cryptographic art through mimicking commodity money realized with networked code. We should bring our focus back to making that work.
The first critics said Bitcoin wouldn't scale. Satoshi continued responding that Moore's law is powerful and text is cheap to store. As more people joined the network there has always been need to optimize the code. Specialize the software repositories and binaries. Respond to the adapting changes in OS landscape. From retail users on smartphones to power users at data centers.
The protocol developers (or reference implementors), today known as Core/Classic developers, have always been able to respond and adapt. The community was smaller and the establishment in society wasn't paying attention. There were less parties interested in the possible, next step, direction of Bitcoin.
Other independently managed development teams have built special mining and wallet protocols. This is healthy for Bitcoin. Various groups of developers have specialized parts of the Bitcoin code system. These groups typically need to be communicated with and coordinated with to safely roll out an upgrade to the protocol. These groups are paying attention to the Fee Event.
As things have become specialized some things have moved in a positive direction for example how SPV wallets put monetary sovereignty in your pocket. Other things like mining pool centralization and custom hardware and data center scale efficiencies that are due to various pressures in the incentive system of mining have taken us further from the original vision in Satoshi's whitepaper and original client. We don't have the solution for that problem today but rest assured that people are thinking about it. One day, an altcoin might get mining, incentive-wise, to a place where CPU/GPU have some inherent advantage when coupled with the use of other hardware on a typical PC.
Bitcoin has longer term decentralization challenges. But today we are faced with a simple short term challenge with a common sense solution.
On the 29th of February 2016, the network became unreliable. Today, there is a short term solution running in production for miners and full nodes called Bitcoin Classic 0.11.2.
Smartphone wallet and web wallet users will not be affected and transactions will start getting confirmed in the normal 10 to 30 minutes. The tiny change it makes is upgrading the block size limit to 2MB with some additional safety code in place. Once 75% of miners have signaled they have upgraded a 28 day grace period begins and we will have a heck of a get out the word campaign to do!
All exchanges, mining pools, large private miners are paying attention. Not everyone who is running a full node is paying attention! When/If Bitcoin Classic activates they will receive a notice in their Bitcoin client that something is not right because blocks are not being found at the regular speed they've slowed down. This will be a message that you may need to upgrade. This has happened before and was effective in getting the long tail of users of full nodes to check the well known discussion sites for news of an event.
2MB means, to me, going from an estimated 10 million user community to a 20 million user community. Even more when medium term SegWit benefits are rolled out.
Bitcoin Classic 0.12 is coming out soon so you will have a best of both worlds. All the good stuff of 0.12 from the Core repository. With the Classic finishing touches.
When/if Classic activates the Core repo would necessarily need to pull the change set from Classic and begin again to work on the same protocol version. At this point either the development release teams merge or they compete for priorities of feature-sets and the market of miners, full nodes and wallets signal readiness for any upcoming protocol upgrade. The latter might be a robust development governance model for the future of Bitcoin.
Join me in upgrading to Bitcoin Classic.
submitted by pointbiz to btc [link] [comments]

Released List of Satoshi Roundtable Attendees Gathering this Weekend

Satoshi Roundtable II
This weekend a group of blockchain and bitcoin industry leaders gather again for the Satoshi Roundtable (satoshiroundtable.org) retreat. Participants in the second Satoshi Roundtable include developers, CEOs, investors, adopters and influencers from the blockchain and bitcoin world.
The retreat is limited to approximately 75 attendees and designed to encourage organic, participant-driven discussion free of the distractions of a conference.
Sessions include several topics of overall blockchain interest and a roundtable discussion on bitcoin capacity.
Please provide any suggestions you have for areas of discussion/ focus.
Partial list of confirmed participants:
Gabriel Abed, CEO, Bitt Charles Allen, CEO, BTCS Gavin Andresen, MIT / Bitcoin Foundation Adam Back, President, Blockstream David Bailey, CEO, yBitcoins Mike Belshe, CEO, BitGo Patrick Byrne, CEO, Overstock / T0 Michael Cao, CEO, zoomhash Dave Carlson, CEO, Mega Big Power Daniel Castagnoli, CCO Exodus Sam Cole, CEO, KNC Miner Matt Corallo, Core Developer Luke Dashjr, Core Developer Anthony Di Iorio, CDO-Toronto Stock Exchange, Founder-Ethereum/Decentral/Kryptokit Joe Disorbo, CEO, Webgistix Jason Dorsett, Early Adopter Evan Duffield, FoundeLead Scientist, Dash Andrew “Flip” Filipowski, Partne Co-Founder, Tally Capital Thomas France, Founder, Ledger Jeff Garzik, Founder, Bloq Yifo Guo, Tech Develope Early Adopter David Johnston, Chairman, Factom Samy Kamkar, Super Hacker Alyse Killeen, Partner, Venture Capital Investor Jason King, Founder, Unsung Mike Komaransky, Cumberland Mining Peter Kroll, Founder, bitaddress.org Bobby Lee, CEO, BTC China, Vice-Chairman of the Board, Bitcoin Foundation Charlie Lee, Director of Engineering, Coinbase/Founder of Litecoin Eric Lombrozo, Founder, Ciphrex Corp / Developer Marshall Long, CTO, Final Hash Matt Luongo, CEO, Fold Jake Mazulewicz, Ph.D. JMA Associates (guest speaker) Human performance researcher Halsey Minor, CEO, Uphold / Founder of CNet Alex Morcos, Hudson Trading/ Core Developer Neha Narula, MIT, Director of DCI – Digital Currency Initiative Dawn Newton, Co-Founder, COO, Netki Justin Newton, Founder CEO, Netki Stephen Pair, Co-FoundeCEO, BitPay Inc. Michael Perklin, President, C4 – CryptoCurrency Certification Consortium / Board Member, Bitcoin Foundation Alex Petrov, CIO, BitFury Phil Potter, CFA, Bitfinex Francis Pouliot, Director, Bitcoin Embassy, Board Member, Bitcoin Foundation JP Richardson, Chief Technical Officer, Exodus Jamie Robinson, QuickBt Jez San, Angel Investor Marco Santori, Partner, Pillsbury Scott Scalf, EVP/Head of Tech Team, Alpha Point Craig Sellars, CTO, Tether Ryan Shea, Co-Founder, One Name Greg Simon, CEO & Co-Founder Ribbit! Me / President, Bitcoin Association Paul Snow, CEO Factom, Texas Bitcoin Conference Riccardo Spagni, Monero Nick Spanos, Founder, Bitcoin Center NYC Elizabeth Stark, Co-Founder & CEO, Lightning Marco Streng, CEO, Genesis Mining Nick Sullivan, CEO, ChangeTip Paul Sztorc, Truthcoin Michael Terpin, CEO, Transform Group Peter Todd, Core Developer Joseph Vaughn Perling, New Liberty Dollar Roger Ver, CEO, Memory Dealers / Bitcoin.com Aaron Voisine, CEO, Breadwallet Zooko Wilcox, CEO, Z Cash Shawn Wilkinson, Founder, Storj Micah Winkelspecht, CEO, Gem
Also, representatives from Blockchain, Bain Capital Ventures, Mycelium, Fidelity Investments and others.
submitted by bruce_fenton to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Is this my bitcoin wallet?

I used a website called bitaddress.org it generated a bitcoin paper wallet for me and gave me an address and a QR code to SHARE and one to keep a secret
Is this what i use to deposit my .00000258btc i got from my 20 minutes of mining today? (when payout is reached)? Later on what is a good place to buy bitcoin? then id add it to my share wallet address? I assume my secret is used to withdraw?
Thanks somuch!
submitted by Tapil to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Live USB Linux Distribution

I'm throwing together a USB Linux distribution that includes essential tools for bitcoin-related tasks.
My current list of tools is as follows:
Any suggestions?
EDIT: Formatting
EDIT 2: An up-to-date list can be found on github
submitted by zdwolfe1 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Gemini terminated my account for moving small amounts to paper wallets.

I've kept paper wallets with 5 BTC or 10 BTC on them for years. As the price of Bitcoin started to rise, ran into several situations where a single wallet having so much $ on it seemed very unwise.
I envisioned Bitcoin hitting $40,000 or $100,000 one day and how stupid it would be to have $1 million dollars on one single cold storage address.
So I decided to move a Bitcoin into Gemini and then send it out to new paper wallets in the amount of 0.02 BTC each. I figured 30 years from now at $100,000 .... 0.02 BTC would be a reasonable $2,000 per address.
And I wouldn't have to mess with my cold storage for decades.
Obviously this would take a long time, and a lot of addresses, but you can create bulk wallet addresses on bitaddress.org and figured I could work on it casually over several months and at the end, be solid.
After about 100 of these, Gemini contacted me asking about suspicious activity on the account. Understandable.
The form letter asked me to respond with an explanation, which I did. When I logged in, I saw a notice telling me that my ability to "Trade" had been suspended and that I should withdraw all my funds immediately. Weird, since it was withdrawals (not trades) that they were worried about. I ignored the notice since I figured I'd hear back from them and we'd work it out.
Two weeks later no response from them. Then I got another letter saying I hadn't responded to them.
So i wrote the whole thing over again and re-sent it. No response from them.
Again I got a form letter saying I hadn't replied yet. So I replied again and asked them to confirm receipt. No response.
Last night, I randomly moved my balance to a different location so it was at Zero, and when I logged in today, it said my account had been terminated.
Not a single word from the Gemini support team this entire time. Fortunately one of my friends routinely speaks with Tyler directly, so now I have to harass her, to harass him and let him know that this happened. I understand the concern about the account activity, but obviously someone should have acknowledged my response and had a conversation with me about it.
Instead, I have to be "that guy" who goes to reddit and makes a stink since using direct channels with support doesn't work.
I hope Gemini isn't going to start becoming like Coinbase. A friend of mine who was new to Bitcoin and wanted to invest heavily with $1 million into his account, got terminated as well, and no amount of communication with them mattered.
submitted by ConanObriensHair to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A few thoughts - Friday, July 4, 2014

Good morning. Since it's a holiday today, I can write thoughts earlier.

An interesting discussion on the 1MB transaction limit

At https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=673415.0, gavinandresen has some interesting comments about a proposal to increase the block frequency of bitcoins. In the thread, it is proposed that, instead of increaqsing the block size, the developers should instead change the difficulty so that blocks are generated more frequently. If the difficulty is reduced by a factor of 20, then blocks appear every 30 seconds instead of every 10 minutes. That also means that 20MB of transactions can occur every 10 minutes, with transaction confirmations being less binary than they are now.
Currently, if five minutes has passed and you don't have your transaction in a block, then you are no better off than you were five minutes ago. The odds of finding a block in the next time interval are no higher than they were five minutes ago. With a shorter time interval, you might have 3 confirmations of lower strength already. For midsize transactions, this is beneficial because the possibility of your transaction being double-spent lies somewhere between 0 and 1, rather than remaining at exactly 1.
However, this runs into problems that are prevalent in many altcoins. Netcoins are an example of an altcoin that has extremely fast block confirmation times. Their difficulty fluctuates wildly. Mining netcoins can produce 20 blocks in ten seconds. We had to disable netcoin mining because even though they are theoretically the most profitable coin, 75% of the blocks were orphaned. Reducing the block time to several blocks per minute turns coins into a free-for-all, where a "confirmation" doesn't mean anything anymore.
I disagree with the assertions in that thread that it would be possible to reduce the block confirmation time down to 5 seconds and that everything would be fine. Such frequent confirmations would result in the mining turning into a race like the stock market is now, where you build dedicated fiber lines from you to the stock exchange to shave off 1ms from your ping time. If people think that centralized mining is a problem now, wait until 5-second blocks appear. The only possible way to compete in a 5-second block environment is to have a large pool with gigabit upload bandwidth and a very low ping time, something that costs $10k/month.

A non-fork solution to the limit

An extremely interesting suggestion that Andresen brings up, and which is the first actually viable idea I've heard to resolve the 1MB transaction limit, is to build a "new P2P" pool. The pool would find "share-blocks" every few seconds. When one of the "new P2P" pool's shares exceeds the difficulty of the original 10-minute network, then it is published to the original blockchain. As the "new P2P" pool grows in size and eventually gains 51% of the hashrate, it essentally becomes the new bitcoin network, even though this blockchain is operating on top of the original chain. Eventually, the pool and the original blockchain both become integrated into the same client, so that it appears that there is only one blockchain, when the actual implementation is a convoluted way behind the scenes.
As he states, "we can do this without a hard fork." However, Andresen misses that even if the "new P2P" pool is a wild success, each of the 5-second blocks can only be 10KB or so in size. Otherwise, the original blockchain would exceed 1MB every 10 minutes. To address this issue, a missing link of consolidating transactions needs to be developed that can make transactions in the original blockchain become pointers to the pool's blockchain.
The way I see the 1MB limit nowadays is as just another engineering problem that needs to be solved. It may be human-created, but it's just as much an impediment to progress at this point as are the laws of physics. Resolving the problem will require the same development process as solving other intractable problems does. You can't change how cancer behaves, so you accept it as a fact of life and then set about figuring out a cure. Similarly, there can't be any hard forks anymore, so the mistakes in the original bitcoin protocol are now as much a problem as the lack of the protocol once was, and it will take innovative ideas to develop something on top of them to solve the problem.
The "new P2P" pool idea is a promising solution to the 1MB transaction limit. There are a few engineering challenges that need to be addressed, but any idea that doesn't require a hard fork is one that can keep bitcoin viable for the long-term.

Time running out?

While there is still time left for the bubble cycle to hold, time seems to be running out. If this bubble doesn't peak within one (or two, but that is probably stretching it) weeks of three Thursdays from now, then the predictions of many will have been inaccurate.
After a brief rise after the auction, the price is again starting to slide down towards the lower boundary, which should now be rising above $550. A break of the lower boundary, as you may recall, would likely signal the end of the cycle, because that has not happened in the past five years.

"Bitcoins are too difficult" is an excuse

There are still people who believe that bitcoins are too difficult for the average person to hold and spend. I disagree with that viewpoint.
As I stated elsewhere, cold storage is pretty easy and the risk, while not 100%, is very low with reasonable precautions. Printing out a wallet at bitaddress.org and putting the paper in a safe deposit box is only vulnerable to theft in the case that some screen-grabbing virus happens to be taking pictures of the screen exactly at the time the wallet is created, sending the images to some server across the Internet, and (most importantly) the hacker knows what he has. Stealing passwords at phishing sites is easy; doing image processing across videos from a botnet is impossible. As to people who say they would not want to print to a printer, are there any bitcoin-stealing printer firmware viruses that even exist? Given that all routers come with default firewalls and (unlike Windows) there is no single printer architecture, how would anyone even go about targeting your printer? There's a difference between theoretical attacks that could happen to someone, someday, and stuff that is actually happening now.
As to spending bitcoins, everyone has a cell phone and anyone can understand how to point a camera at a QR code.
I propose that the idea that bitcoins are insecure is a product of a few people who post the same story to many forums claiming that they lost hundreds of bitcoins due to some virus, when in reality there are millions of people using bitcoins and about 10 people have ever lost their life savings due to a virus. Some of the stories aren't true, so the number of people who lost bitcoins is even smaller.
People figure out elaborate scams and kickbacks and accounting tricks all the time to rip each other off. Most of these scams are so convoluted and pull in so little money that it is more profitable to simply get a job. It is nonsense to suggest that if people could make a significant amount of money by spending bitcoins rather than credit cards, people wouldn't go to great lengths to save cash.
The reality is that if retailers started offering discounts to pay in bitcoins, then people would be motivated to figure out how to use bitcoins, even if it was actually difficult to create a wallet. Why doesn't Overstock give a 3% discount instead of donating 3% to foundations - as the 3% discount would both benefit them and do more to further bitcoins than anything else would? When you add credit card fees and losses due to chargeback fraud, most retailers could give a 5% discount without any problem. When Coinbase and Bitpay start convincing merchants to offer such bonuses, then the excuse that "it's too difficult" will go away.

Toastmasters

I was asked on Wednesday to write about Toastmasters, an organization dedicated to improving public speaking skills. I attend Toastmaters meetings every other Thursday, which is why I usually do not contribute on Thursdays.
Toastmasters is a great organization that is geared towards people who know little about speaking. My belief is that people who know a little more about public speaking can still learn a lot, but the "competent communicator" manuals that Toastmasters provides focus a great deal on fear of public speaking. People who enjoy public speaking, like myself, or at least people who have no fear of it, may find themselves disappointed by how much emphasis Toastmasters places on eliminating fear of speaking.
One way that Toastmasters addresses fear of speaking is to provide evaluations. But I am always frustrated at evaluation speeches, because the Toastmasters manuals specify that 90% of evaluation speeches should be focused on positive comments. If I performed poorly, I want to know about it; I'm not worried about hurt feelings. In Toastmasters-sponsored speech contests, they do not announce anyone except the winners, which has made me less likely to participate because I can't gain anything from contests where I don't know who I was better than.
Despite these shortcomings, I would still recommend Toastmasters to anyone interested in improving their speaking as there are few alternatives. If anyone knows of a group where feelings and emotions are viewed as less important, please let know as I think there is a need for people who have no fear but could still improve their skills.

Other

submitted by quintin3265 to BitcoinThoughts [link] [comments]

How to sell 1 BTC from a paper wallet to a buyer in LocalBitcoins? Is there any other method in order to sell it to him?

So let's say that I have exactly 1 BTC in a paper wallet which was created in bitaddress.org (at the moment I am the only owner of the private key) and I want to sell it for cash in a face-to-face transaction, just as it is.
Given that I will proceed with a personal trade, I could sell it without a platfrom, directly from wallet to wallet, the thing is if I do it through LocalBitcoins there's an stand out buyer in my area who will pay me a higher price- than what I have being able to find solo so far-, with only two conditions:
  1. That we summit the trade through LocalBitcoins so as to freeze the price at that moment by enabling the escrow, and also because that way he will have the certainity that I do own the coins and that I am willing to sell them before meeting me.
  2. That it is 1 BTC exactly what I will sell him.
LocalBitcoins:
If he insisted in doing it through LocalBitcoins, then first I would have to IMPORT (not sweep, because that way it would always cost me a fee) the full balance of my paper wallet into either an account in blockchain.info or a software wallet like Electrum, right?
Once the 1 BTC is in digital form, if I were to sell them to him using their escrow system I would have to send the Bitcoins into an account of mine in LocalBitcoins (that would cost me a fee), then put and add (another fee?) that he will buy from, put the Bitcoins on escrow (third fee?) and finally once he has paid me send the bitcoins from my wallet to his (a fourth(?) fee).
Or is that whole process not necessary if he already has an add from where he buys the Bitcoins? Can I just summit the sell, and we would still have the option of putting my Bitcoins in escrow there? And that way only having to paid the fees from the actual trade, or does the escrow also has a fee?, making it that way two fees.
Escrow My Bits or Bitrated:
Either way seems like if I go down the LocalBitcoins route fees are impossible to evade. I do think he could understand about one sending fee discounted from the 1 BTC, and as what he wants is to freeze the price and be certain of me having the coins, meaning using an escrow, we could also utilize an escrow service/smart contract like Escrow My Bits or Bitrated, and that way only having to paid the sending fee.
Giving out the paper wallet:
Just like I explained, in this scenario, selling exaclty 1 BTC would mean that I have to evade fees because I do not have any more Bitcoins disponible to play with, and as I have it understood the only way I could do such thing is by literally giving him the paper wallet that he will then sweep up where he pleases, however that way we wouldn't be using LocalBitcoins or any escrow, so I doubt he will agree.
In conclusion:
Is there any way of reducing fees to only one in the whole procces of selling the Bitcoins from my paper wallet to the buyer's wallet in LocalBitcoins?, if not, Escrow My Bits or Bitrated are options for an escrow system that would only requiere of one seding fee discounted, right?, and, is there any other method apart from giving out the paper wallet that we could use which will include escrow and not cost me a fee?
Thank you for the aswers.
submitted by DavidHumeonPhenibut to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Ideas for really safe Cold Storage

The Three Legged Stool of safe storage. I've given a lot of thought about how I can safely store my Bitcoins. I want to share my method in the hope others may find this helpful and any discussion could also help me. I'm not intending this as a beginners guide to cold storage, plenty already exist. But people, both new and familiar with cold storage, can benefit from the applications and ideas I'm suggesting here.
The Three Legged Stool, what's this about? There are just three ways to unintentionally lose your coins: Leg 1, They can be stolen Leg 2, They can be physically lost Leg 3, You can forget how to access them
The snag is that anything done to improve security to one Leg tends to increase the risk of loss caused by being out of balance with the other two Legs. For example, to protect your coins against Leg 1 (being stolen) you may hide the coins private key in a password protected container somewhere in your house. My point is that you have reduced the risk of Leg 1 (getting them stolen) but at the same time increased the risk of Leg 2 (physically lost) and Leg 3 (forget the password). This is especially true with long term storage. Equally, not using a password protects against Leg 3 but increases the risks from Leg 1 and is of no help against Leg 2. The objective is a balanced stool, keeping your coins safe and also always available for spending.
How it can be done: My preferred method is using Paper Wallets with BIP38 encryption. With secure passwords, these are so safe you can keep multiple copies of the same wallet all over the place. Keep copies at work, at home, at your parents house and even carry the private key QR code with your phone in case you want to spend a chunk of Bitcoins unexpectedly. Brute force attacks on BIP38 wallets are so slow, I can't think it's possible to crack a strong password of let's say 10 random letters, numbers and symbols. So this is total protection against Leg 1 and Leg 2 but forget that password Leg 3.... and your coins are gone forever!
Here's the clever bit. So how can you guarantee never to forget that complex wallet password? Yes! There's an App for that, "Infinite Password Generator" (IPG) is truly brilliant. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=yuku.infinitepassgen.app
The only permission this App has is to access Google Play payment services so I don't think it can give any secrets back to the developer. Install this app and make backups of the APK, save backups on several devices in case it's ever removed from Google Play. If you change your phone you will want to be able to install IPG from your APK backups and it's best not to update this App. If you do update it then always check it is generating the same passwords using the procedure explained below.
IPG generates complex passwords by combining your own "Master Password" with a Keyword. As an example, your Master Password must be something you can NEVER forget like the house number and road name you lived in as a child. The Keyword is a unique identifier for this Paper Wallet, maybe a name and incrementing sequence number like wallet3. IPG combines these two fields to generate a secure repeatable password you can use as the input to the BIP38 encryption.
IPG let's you save its configuration settings and you need to do this: Fill in the Master Password, put your name in the Keyword field, press Show and select the type and length of BIP38 password you want then press Copy (to the clipboard). Now, paste the generated password over the Personal notes (optional) field. Next, delete the Master Password field and Save, then exit IPG.
Open IPG and Load your saved file, fill in Master Password then Copy/paste the generated password under the original copy of the password and if you did this all correctly you will have generated exactly the same password, confirming you put in the Master Password correctly. Now change the Keyword field to your chosen Wallet Identifier, let's use my example above wallet3 and this will generate the required unique password for that BIP38 Paper Wallet you're about to make. I would write 3 as a hint on all copies of this Paper Wallet to make sure I don't forget the full Keyword. The next Paper Wallet I generate being wallet4, marked 4. Also I paste a copy of the IPG generated password into a Truecrypt encrypted container as a last chance disaster recovery.
Final steps to use IPG safely. You must close this App correctly otherwise it stays a while in memory containing all your secret information. Then you need to clear the clipboard of the wallet password and I've been using an App called Clipboard Autoclear+ to do this. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=de.tactilesoftworks.clipboardsentinel
I've used two Paper Wallet generators, my favorite is https://www.bitaddress.org but it's a bit cumbersome to produce multiple copies of the same wallet. I also like https://bitcoinpaperwallet.com because they can produce Testnet Wallets which is a coin identical to Bitcoin but uses valueless coins purely to be for testing purposes. Google Testnet Wallets for more info.
Spending from your Paper Wallet is easier to do than explain and I started by using the Blockchain.info Android App. But this has let me down with an error message "insufficient funds" and I see many complaints about this problem. I wrote to Blockchain.info about it but got no reply. Since then I moved to Mycelium Wallet https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.mycelium.wallet and have had no problems with this. Also they do a Testnet version of Mycelium which is incredibly useful.
In Mycelium you just scan your Paper Wallets public address to watch how many Bitcoins there are in them. When you want to spend from the Paper Wallet, first run IPG, load the file and fill in the passwords then copy the Paper Wallet password to the clipboard. During the Send transaction Mycelium will ask to scan the wallet Private Key, it then asks for the BIP38 password which you can paste in from IPG and the amount of Bitcoin to send and off it goes.
A couple of important points to consider if you're not spending the full amount from the Paper Wallet. Once your private key has been used like this you really should send the remaining Bitcoins the next Paper Wallet in the sequence called, using my example, wallet4. That's because once a private key has been used or exposed to an online device, it's no longer safe to consider it as cold storage. If you don't spend all the coins on your Paper Wallet it's likely you will get back change and you must be sure the Wallet App you're using supports this or your change will disappear as a donation to the mining community. Mycelium and Blockchain.info Wallets automatically look after sending your change back to the Paper Wallet's corresponding public address. OTHER APPS MIGHT NOT DO THIS SO BE CAREFUL.
Generating Paper Wallets should be done on an offline device such as an old Android phone factory reset and only used for this purpose or a bootable Linux USB.
In conclusion this approach overcomes my doubts about my ability to remember long term secure passwords, possibly years after I made them up, because I shouldn't forget the Master Password as it's something so personal to me and the Keyword is almost attached to the Paper Wallet. Leg 3 is dealt with and Legs 2 and 3 now take care of themselves.
I do hope some of you find these ideas helpful. The developer of IPG Yukuku does not make any provision for donations and I would happily make a donation for this excellent App that is also available for Windows.
Disclaimer, these ideas are for your consideration and debate only. I take no responsibility whatsoever for any losses that may arise however they are incurred. I have absolutely no connection or financial interest in any of the applications I have referred to here.
submitted by LeScarecrow to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I want to consolidate my tiny amount of BTC and need some advice.

Back in the day when the Bitcoin crashed, I thought it was all over so I went ahead and used it all on SatoshiDice. I see that was a huge mistake as it is no longer worth mining without specialized hardware and Bitcoins are trading at a record high. I would like to consolidate my now pauper sum of 0.00225552 onto paper form using the bitaddress.org paper wallet, but my Bitcoin client is Bitcoin-QT and it refuses to transfer the sum to an address without a fee of 0.01 BTC. What can I do?
Edit for more information: When I splurged on SatoshiDice my wallet became fragmented with addresses so I have about a dozen addresses that makes up the total 0.00225552 BTC wallet. I can't figure out a way to consolidate the total sum to one address in order to send it to a Paper Wallet.
Edit2: Managed to import all my addresses into BlockChain.info but I can't send it anywhere as I am getting an error of "Insufficient funds. Value Needed 0.00325552 BTC. Available amount 0.00225552 BTC". Even though I put the Miners Fee to Zero it still wants a cut.
submitted by SonOfJaak to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Wallets are like magic! They can do so much, but I do have some questions...

Been involved in bitcoin a few weeks now, aware for a few months, bought in a 19 (woo!), anyway, wallets are still a bit mystifying and magical and multi-headed.
What's amazing to me is this site: www.bitaddress.org
Under the tab "wallet details" it's able to calculate a public address from just the private key? How is that possible?
So, if I lose my public address and only have my private key, I can find the address using this site, and ostensibly the bitcoin spec provides details on how to recover the public addy mathematically so others could do the same, so technically all we really need to save is the private key? Is that correct? If you lost your wallet.dat file but still had your private key, you still have your bitcoins, yes?
The bulk wallet is interesting too, allowing a company to generate as many addresses as needed for individual transactions. Do all these addresses unlock with the same private-key? That's pretty amazing.
The paper wallet is interesting, some have suggested handing these out to waiters in lieu of tips, the idea being you send the tip to the paper address via smartphone on the spot after your meal.
And finally the brain wallet, the one that's going to get a lot of people in trouble. Ultimately, I think a lot of fortunes will be secured by a brain-wallet simply because you don't need anything physical to secure your wallet. There's nothing to lose. But on the other hand, forget your passphrase, or make one too weak, and you're completely screwed. Anyone, anywhere, if they can guess your passphrase can check to see if the address that results from their guess has any coins in it, and since the private key results from the passphrase, they can take your coins!
But, for short-term bitcoin smuggling, such as if you had to cross a military border or something, there'd be no more savvy way to do it than with a brainwallet, just keep it there short-term.
But I have no doubt that hundreds of years from now we'll still have people mining passphrases hoping to hit the jackpot, and occasionally they'll find some.
So, to recap, one private key can work with many public addresses, yes? So you could generate an address to receive funds, and then generate a new address to send those same funds, does that work? Or are you stuck with one public address and have to move linearly between generated one?
Fire scares me. How many people will lose their bitcoin addys and keys to fire? I've been thinking of creating a cold-storage wallet and engraving the details on a steel plate :P What do you guys think. Fireproof.
submitted by Anenome5 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to sell 1 BTC from a paper wallet to a buyer in LocalBitcoins? Is there any other method in order to sell it to him?

So let's say that I have exactly 1 BTC in a paper wallet which was created in bitaddress.org (at the moment I am the only owner of the private key) and I want to sell it for cash in a face-to-face transaction, just as it is.
Given that I will proceed with a personal trade, I could sell it without a platfrom, directly from wallet to wallet, the thing is if I do it through LocalBitcoins there's an stand out buyer in my area who will pay me a higher price- than what I have being able to find solo so far-, with only two conditions:
  1. That we summit the trade through LocalBitcoins so as to freeze the price at that moment by enabling the escrow, and also because that way he will have the certainity that I do own the coins and that I am willing to sell them before meeting me.
  2. That it is 1 BTC exactly what I will sell him.
LocalBitcoins:
If he insisted in doing it through LocalBitcoins, then first I would have to IMPORT (not sweep, because that way it would always cost me a fee) the full balance of my paper wallet into either an account in blockchain.info or a software wallet like Electrum, right?
Once the 1 BTC is in digital form, if I were to sell them to him using their escrow system I would have to send the Bitcoins into an account of mine in LocalBitcoins (that would cost me a fee), then put and add (another fee?) that he will buy from, put the Bitcoins on escrow (third fee?) and finally once he has paid me send the bitcoins from my wallet to his (a fourth(?) fee).
Or is that whole process not necessary if he already has an add from where he buys the Bitcoins? Can I just summit the sell, and we would still have the option of putting my Bitcoins in escrow there? And that way only having to paid the fees from the actual trade, or does the escrow also has a fee?, making it that way two fees.
Escrow My Bits or Bitrated:
Either way seems like if I go down the LocalBitcoins route fees are impossible to evade. I do think he could understand about one sending fee discounted from the 1 BTC, and as what he wants is to freeze the price and be certain of me having the coins, meaning using an escrow, we could also utilize an escrow service/smart contract like Escrow My Bits or Bitrated, and that way only having to paid the sending fee.
Giving out the paper wallet:
Just like I explained, in this scenario, selling exaclty 1 BTC would mean that I have to evade fees because I do not have any more Bitcoins disponible to play with, and as I have it understood the only way I could do such thing is by literally giving him the paper wallet that he will then sweep up where he pleases, however that way we wouldn't be using LocalBitcoins or any escrow, so I doubt he will agree.
In conclusion:
Is there any way of reducing fees to only one in the whole procces of selling the Bitcoins from my paper wallet to the buyer's wallet in LocalBitcoins?, if not, Escrow My Bits or Bitrated are options for an escrow system that would only requiere of one seding fee discounted, right?, and, is there any other method apart from giving out the paper wallet that we could use which will include escrow and not cost me a fee?
Thank you for the aswers.
submitted by DavidHumeonPhenibut to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

an "open source" generic offline Linux QR/2key generator and secure cold storage wallet that is small portable quickly acquired and easy to use.

A Bitcoin Root for Linux/Android Phones
A simple Ledger Program and Offline Bitcoin Address/2Key Generator With a Friendly Integrated GUI Written in Linux and Installed on a Cold Bricked Android Phone.
Let me briefly introduce myself, . I am a 10 year Linux PC user (Fedora, Mint, ) which I installed myself through time on various old PCs , Laptops, and Netbooks either online or by usb. . I am trying to find someone who might be interested in writing a: Rooted, Data bricked, Linux Android Phone Program for me,
The program I am proposing and putting forth to the current Linux Open Source, community, for help on would be installed on a unwanted older android phones,
The exact program is “a Linux, “Open Source”, Offline Bitcoin Account Ledger & address QR code generator with a save to memory capability for backups These Backups can be done offline either through tetheusb to offline computer to usb thumbdrive, or to offline printer for paper backup, or without tether, to an already existing external SD card slot if available. And lastly it would have a friendly simple integrated ledger GUI.”
It's a vary small program root and total install, intended to be installed upon a rooted android device which is then immediately wiped clean of the pre existing software file system. The pure Linux open source program would then upon installation as a whole program be vacant and devoid of any files designed to recognize any data transfer capabilities of the physical phone hardware itself” After installation it becomes unaware of such things as bluetooth and wifi, hardware. Thus it cannot transfer data . . The phone is no longer a phone and it does not, nor ever will again' transmit data, for lack of a better term I am calling this cold bricking a phone, . The only means left of communication would be through the screen/camera of a single displayed QR code., This program is intended and permanent unless a re root and re installation is done. The Cold storage function has been "air gapped" The proposed program is so basic in its entire existence. It would easily not over exceed nor ever tax any current cell phone's memory resources or processing requirements. The more minimal and simplistic the entire program the better its meant to be a simple device. Free to the masses in need.
Some of the bottlenecks of the current growing Bitcoin system i can see existing in the world today are
!. It's current lack of a simple use for the common man. 2. It lacks of security for the first time user.
My reason for wanting to make this open source and free and easy is that it might help many people in emergency situations around the world today. Im hoping to make Bitcoin more immediately accessible to this population and the global community as well. This software upon root installation” should provide A safe and secure alternate currency offline cold wallet with quick reliable immediate access to all currently existing online crypto currency exchanges within the global network,. one can then use those existing exchanges to transfer with other entities such as ATM and personal one on one trade as well.and then one can safely secure ones funds and private keys offline. .
This cold bricking physically changes the devices hereafter purpose and function permanently. The old device is now a new device.”
An installed Bitcoin QR code offline generating software program should also have an easy to use user friendly GUI through a Account Books/Ledger GUI. . In the background it would run a Bitcoin Address/2Key offline creation program letting the user have the final 2key QR code image upon users command. It would use camera QR code transfer input and phone screen QR code transfer output The Account Book GUI will prompt the user for type of transfer and amount.
In the end you should have a secure offline cold wallet, portable, with internal offline QR code generating capabilities.
Why I personally want this program, . The Bitcoin phenomena itself has shown that a globally owned currency might be of good use in our world today. Especially in the areas of rescuing localized economic fiat collapse. For a large percentage of citizens living upon within these regional local communities (communities such as Venezuela and Greece 2017). It has in very recent modern times shown that BTC might be be a possible economic rescue tool. The gold and silver community have always believed that precious metals could be used in times of economic collapse, And a long history would dictate their reasoning to be a possible valid and working system. . But as of late there has been a new competitor in this arena of economic relief brought on by the advent of industrial computerization and the world wide web, . This digital global currency system currently BTC may in fact help all of humanity as a tool in stabilizing stressed individuals within collapsing economies. I believe both systems (precious metals and BTC) are valid opportunities and tools for economic rescue, And both can be tried. The Global Digital System is a new one yet to be looked into and fully tried.
In countries today such as those afore mentioned, We as of now currently can find a small percentage of the population experimenting with this global digital currency as refuge while their local fiat slowly collapses around them. This new global BTC currency system may be a large step forwards in protecting many local communities during economic duress in the near future. But it is not widely used amongst these troubled populations.
The problem I see in this new Global BTC System, is in its infancy and growing pains it still lacks ease of use, and availability, which then leads to mistakes in security of assets,
Today, as of this date, . in order to acquire and secure your digital currency in the event of an emergency, You must be tech wise concerning all the avenues of online and digital offline cold storage transfer. You must then purchase an airgapped cold wallet device and you must learn how to use and correctly manipulate this difficult technology, To do this You can download apps that are simply more middlemen in the system of exchange and some not cold secured. , Some apps are better than others, but most fail at differing points. If you do not use and learn how to tranfer amongst apps into total cold storage where you own your private key, Then you can learn make a linux bbotable usb, .and generate offline addresses. then From a laptop or PC, making paper copies on a printer or save offline on digital format, You must then also know the correct ways to transfer and connect this digital data without losing it. (sweeping/importing). For the common man this task is currently daunting and time consuming.
I believe this small open source program largely helps answer the “availability and ease” for most citizens in todays world whether in distressed economies or not, It would also stand to reason that the faster the individuals within an economicly distressed population can get onto a mass globally supported reserve currency, The sooner their people can begin to repair their local system. Once a local community fixes their economic problems the local people by nature while on BTC should then migrate back into the repaired local system. They should migrate naturally back once it becomes more desirable again at a local level, . as long as both systems (global and local) co exist and if the global currency is always freely open to the citizens across the world to invest in at will freely decentralized and anonymously, the global digital currency may have possible avenues of a stable reserve rescue for those in localized economic distress.
Yet, . . as I said it needs at this current time to be more quickly and readily available and easier for the people to use. This is whats lacking in the system as I see it, . . I dont think this new global digital currency is an answer to all and everything, . . . But I do believe it has its advantages. If you have a global wide increased acceptance and use of BTC on a grand geographically diversified scale
What I have done so far , . I have taken an old beloved and reliable android phone laying in my drawer, (a Samsung sch1200) and without rooting it, and by simply downloading two apps from the google play store , I have successfully made it a secure Bitcoin cold storage offline wallet that generates Bitcoin addresses and keys offline, it has a QR code scanner though the phone camera and a screen to display before said QR codes. The device I now have was inexpensive, widely available, and gets easier for me to use for BTC transactions every day, It also securely saves all my BTC offline where I am in charge of protecting those assets myself.
It is an offline bitcoin QR generator and cold storage device.
So if I have done this already why am I asking the Linux community for help.
The one I have right now is tedious as I have hodge podged it together with various apps and must manually create and move my QR data around between apps and ledgers. I Scan a QR code with “QR-Droid” save it manually, cut and paste both adresses and keys. Then save them on a word processor doc. All my addresses key pairs are then saved on individually named docs like unto a digital paper wallet and finally integrated into a single folder for cold storage backup,
As a side note for “random QR code adress and bitcoin key generation” I must, open a previously installed browser “Opera Mini” and the generate the random Bit address and QR key set from the previously saved offline page “bitaddress.org”, (I believe its a simple jave script HTML program, but im not sure),
I have successfully and easily then there after moved funds to my Coinbase and Mycelium accounts and back again, cross platform with no problems and great efficiency and ease, Its totally offline portable code generation and cold storage . IT works well for me, I am in control of my private keys, I also easily back up my data, and I do it often, . every time I generate a new key set I back it up to an external SD , . . and its extreamly portable.
A simple ledger checkbook offline QR cold storage system that creates and manages offline private keys in the background on a reliable no longer used dormant phone, since old phones might fail as in any technology, , (But mine is running strong), It has backup capabilities to either the existing usb tether or if so equipped and my favorite, . external SD card.
In closing I will say, . . .I have the utmost respect for the Linux open source community as a whole,. The only way I would ever pursue this endeavor would be through them, . any other way will not do.
And if by now it falls to nothingness like dreams never written , . . .At least I would urge you all to go to any nice high spot overlooking all people spread across your local community (city or town). Look out upon it, and then ask yourself, what would happen if these my friends below found out they had lost their local fiat currency suddenly all at once today.
And if you don't do that, . . Meh, . .I still have the utmost respect for you anyways, and its all good, . . yeah I just went Crazy today,
Anyways, Thank you for your time. .
P.S. and, . .A Friend I once met along the Bitcoin path recently saw what what I had so crudely made out of an old phone and made a video of it and put it online for me , , it can be found here
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0LTu59a5IJA&t=9s
And now I am tired of editing, . I quit, . .it is as it is, . . you'll just have to wade through it people, or get a couple of sentences in and toss it aside, . And .if you got this far, thank you for wading through it.
 Eclecticuniversalas 
02-21-2017
submitted by eclecticuniversalas to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

It occured to me that all cryptocoins using an unaltered version of bitaddress.org address creation scheme and same address mining transfer hash would all be able to use the SAME ADDRESSES although of course the AMOUNTS in each coin in that same address would vary BY COIN BLOCKCHAIN. Correct?

In other words my
bitaddress001
should also be able to be loaded into my dogecoin wallet
and
catcoin wallet
and in each block chain that bitaddress001 would have different amounts of each coin depending on which wallet and coin blockchain you were using.
this is becuase the bitaddress.org scheme assigns addresses by random chance and there is no coordination with the block chain becuase there isnt any need to.
And the public and the spend address should be related in the same way with each coin in any blockchain and mining software as long as the coin's official software doesn't change how a spend address is validated.
Am I right or wrong?
Are there any coins whose spend and public address system is not standardized on the bitcoin system and the bitaddress.org system?
submitted by georedd to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Was Mycelium or bitcoin ever hacked?

I had an offline wallet with its details stored in Keepass. The last time I ever touched it was in December 2014 to buy something online. I loaded the private key in mycelium's Android app and used it. Then, I deleted the app. I know I should have generated a new offline wallet and transfered the remaining funds there but I got lazy... I just casually decided to check out my bitcoin today and I have zero funds... There's a transaction on August 31, 2015 that took from a lot of different addresses (including mine) and dumped into a lot of new addresses. This was definitely NOT me. I wasn't even using bitcoin in 2015.
 
Now I know it's gone and nothing can be done. But what the hell happened? This was not supposed to be possible with bitcoin. Was the network attacked sometime between December 2014 and now or did the mycelium developer turn out to be a fraud? The only other service I used was bitaddress.org to make a QR code out of my key to scan it into the app but I could see back then in the network log that it wasn't sending any AJAX request. I'm confused how this happened and want closure. can anybody provide any input?
~0.5 bitcoin gone :(
submitted by PLATYPUS_DIARRHEA to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Gemini has terminated my account and ignored all my communication.

I've kept paper wallets with 5 BTC or 10 BTC on them for years. As the price of Bitcoin started to rise, ran into several situations where a single wallet having so much $ on it seemed very unwise.
I envisioned Bitcoin hitting $40,000 or $100,000 one day and how stupid it would be to have $1 million dollars on one single cold storage address.
So I decided to move a Bitcoin into Gemini and then send it out to new paper wallets in the amount of 0.02 BTC each. I figured 30 years from now at $100,000 .... 0.02 BTC would be a reasonable $2,000 per address.
And I wouldn't have to mess with my cold storage for decades.
Obviously this would take a long time, and a lot of addresses, but you can create bulk wallet addresses on bitaddress.org and figured I could work on it casually over several months and at the end, be solid.
After about 100 of these, Gemini contacted me asking about suspicious activity on the account. Understandable.
The form letter asked me to respond with an explanation, which I did. When I logged in, I saw a notice telling me that my ability to "Trade" had been suspended and that I should withdraw all my funds immediately. Weird, since it was withdrawals (not trades) that they were worried about. I ignored the notice since I figured I'd hear back from them and we'd work it out.
Two weeks later no response from them. Then I got another letter saying I hadn't responded to them.
So i wrote the whole thing over again and re-sent it. No response from them.
Again I got a form letter saying I hadn't replied yet. So I replied again and asked them to confirm receipt. No response.
Last night, I randomly moved my balance to a different location so it was at Zero, and when I logged in today, it said my account had been terminated.
Not a single word from the Gemini support team this entire time. Fortunately one of my friends routinely speaks with Tyler directly, so now I have to harass her, to harass him and let him know that this happened. I understand the concern about the account activity, but obviously someone should have acknowledged my response and had a conversation with me about it.
Instead, I have to be "that guy" who goes to reddit and makes a stink since using direct channels with support doesn't work.
I hope Gemini isn't going to start becoming like Coinbase. A friend of mine who was new to Bitcoin and wanted to invest heavily with $1 million into his account, got terminated as well, and no amount of communication with them mattered.
submitted by ConanObriensHair to Gemini [link] [comments]

How it is to use Bitcoin Core for cold storage, and how it should be

We all have our fetishes, and one of mine is creating the ultimate cold storage technique. I hope you will agree that although very cumbersome, it is highly ultimate. Any feedback for improvements is welcome.

Here is the current process I have:

  1. Prepare your cold storage computer. Start with a copy of linux. Encrypt the home folder during setup. Use a strong log in password.
  2. Add Bitcoin Core
  3. Add bitaddress.org
  4. Roll dice to get entropy (d6 needs 62 rolls. d10 needs 48 rolls. d16 needs 40 rolls.)
  5. Stamp entropy into metal plate for durability. I use a d10 so I only need numeric stamps. Metal plate could be a blank square galvanized steel outlet cover.
  6. Decide on a format for converting entropy into a brainwallet phrase. E.g. ENTROPY+PASSWORD+### where ### is a serial number. PASSWORD is a short, easy to remember word to protect you in case someone gets a copy of your entropy.
  7. Open bitaddress.org and input your passphrase into the brainwallet tab.
  8. Copy the private key and import it to Bitcoin Core with importprivkey.
  9. Copy the address and dump it from Bitcoin Core with dumpprivkey.
  10. Dumped private key should match the one created from bitaddress.
  11. Copy the private key and paste it to the "wallet details" tab of bitaddress.
  12. Select the "BIP38 Encrypt" button. Supply a passphrase.
  13. Print out the encrypted private key on paper. Write down the ### index used to produce this address. You can reproduce this address from the entropy on the metal plate if you have to.
  14. When you want to spend the bitcoins, you need a different computer, with tor, Bitcoin Core and enough of the blockchain so that it has the block that funded your cold address.
  15. Disconnect your spending computer from the network.
  16. Importprivkey for the address you wish to spend from. Create your transaction, which should spend always spend the entire wallet balance. Use coin control if this computer has other bitcoins on it.
  17. Connect your spending computer to the network via tor to broadcast. Alternatively you can set walletbroadcast=0 and use the gettransaction RPC call to obtain the signed transaction. Then you can broadcast your transaction using a different computer that has never touched the private key.
Yes, I understand it would be far more convenient to use a hardware wallet. One of my goals here though is to only trust Bitcoin Core. In fact, you may have noticed that I do not even fully trust Bitcoin Core, since bitaddress.org is independently deriving addresses from the entropy.

Here is the process I want:

I would challenge Bitcoin Core to add features to achieve a similar level of security with a much less awkward process. Here's what I have in mind:
  1. Roll dice to create Entropy. Stamp on metal for durability.
  2. On your cold computer, convert entropy into xprivkey.
  3. Import xprivkey to Core.
  4. Export xpubkey from Core.
  5. On your spending computer, import xpubkey.
  6. Make transactions from spending computer. Export unsigned transactions.
  7. Move unsigned transactions to cold computer for signing.
  8. Sign transactions on cold computer.
  9. Move signed transactions to spending computer for broadcast.
  10. Default for Core is to broadcast transactions over tor if tor is installed, even if ordinary node activity is over normal internet.
submitted by moral_agent to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Coinbase question

A couple of months ago, after quite a bit of saving and buying on coinbase, i reached my first BTC. Yay!
My question, everyone says that as long as it is in a coinbase wallet, it doesn't exactly "belong" to me, more or less, it's owed to me. My questions: * Is it safe in Coinbase? I know hackers are going for btc left and right, and it appears that (at least so far) every major website that was hacked has in some way gotten them back. * I watched a video about a paper wallet/cold storage, why would that be any safer than coinbase? Isn't bitaddress.org just as likely to be hit? * How do I help BTC grow? I'm in the United States midwest (Kansas City to be exact), and here, we are a bit behind on the whole Bitcoin craze. I bought a thing or two online, but pretty much just through newegg. * How do I convert MangoCoinz to Bitcoin? I have the app on my phone, have "mined" about 100 MangoCoinz, and want to convert them to BTC. What is a safe website to do so?
submitted by ckellingc to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Having trouble sending funds

Yesterday, I made a post after having a transaction fail to be accepted into the blockchain. This morning, I attempted the transaction again to the same address—this time with a fee. This is also still unconfirmed now for over 12 hours.
Here is the address I am attempting to fund: 1HswqbS6swTMarPh6QwQme9QmBA12cwoMp
Some factors I think could be affecting this:
I see transactions on blockchain coming in with 0.0001, 0.00014, 0.0000518, etc. Why are these being accepted but mine are not? I have successfully sent some transactions in the past but never had this sort of trouble when including fees similar to what I have included recently. Can someone recommend some next steps to get back on track? I really just want to fund a paper wallet to keep some BTC in cold storage.
TLDR: I keep trying to send bitcoins to an address, but my transactions are not even being accepted anymore—even when including what I think are sufficient fees.
edit: make more legible
submitted by ddIbb to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Low-tech signing and sending

So I've got an incredibly small amount of BTC that I've scraped from bitcoinget.com for testing and learning purposes, which I sent to a wallet that I generated from bitaddress.org. I want to eventually keep larger amounts of BTC on a freshly-installed Linux distro on a perpetually-offline netbook. While I do have access to a second, online computer, it doesn't have the hardware resources to run the Armory client, or even the full Bitcoin-QT client with it's large multi-GB blockchain download. Furthermore, that computer is at my workplace - I have complete administrative control over the machine, however the network admins here block the necessary port (8333), presumably to keep people from using our server rooms for mining.
So my question is, given the contraints described above, how do I go about coming up with a workable, secure method for using BTC? If I have an address with 1 BTC, and I want to send, say .53756 BTC to a new address, what tools should I go about using to sign/send the transaction? What about the remaining fraction of BTC in the original address? Is there some easy tool or way to break up the BTC contained in one address across multiple others, that is workable with my constraints? E.g. "send .53756 to address A and send the remainder in that wallet to address B"?
submitted by hags_claw to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Where does Electrum get its randomness?

In answering a similar question about bitaddress.org, I realized I didn't know the answer for another popular cold storage solution:
When Electrum starts up fresh, it generates a new seed value for you (and shows it to you in the form of 12 words). However, where does the randomness come from to generate that new seed? What would someone need to know/do to seed the Electrum PRNG to spit out the same seed value as mine (and get all my Bitcoins)?
submitted by MidnightLightning to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[FOR HIRE] Bitcoin Vanity Addresses

Hello, i'm selling bitcoin vanity addresses up to 5 characters long for 5 mBTC. I can also do 6 character addresses that are case-insensitive. If you would like one, I will accept payment once I have finished generating your address. Please go to http://bitaddress.org and click on the vanity wallet tab. Then click generate, and either PM me your public key and your desired prefix or post it in a reply here. Make sure you save the private key as without it you cannot create your vanity address. It does not matter if anyone else sees your public key. Once I have finished I will send first and trust you will send the payment. You will recieve a Part Private key from me. From there, follow the instructions on bitaddress.org and combine your private key with mine to recieve the private key for your wallet. From there you can import it into most wallets. Thanks for reading!
submitted by Mooshire to Jobs4Bitcoins [link] [comments]

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How to make a Bitcoin address or paper wallet using Bitaddress.org

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