Benchmarks - CHIP

gpu.js - GPU Accelerated JavaScript

submitted by speckz to javascript [link] [comments]

OS and most applications/games are suddenly unbearably slow

Hi all. Suddenly most of my 3D games are really slow (even WoW classic takes 6 minutes to boot up!), as well as software (BattleNet launcher, Steam). Slow as in takes minutes to boot up (compared to seconds normally) as well as hanging up with "not responding" and slow on loading content, and in games I get stutter once they slowly booted up. The entire OS feels sluggish, it's like PC barely manages to run it without bigger hick-ups, but chokes on games. Installation of software seems slow, downloads in chrome are slow to finish (when virus scan is run on them, I guess). Even restarting system is slow, despite it being on SSD.
Relatively new build, I'm on a Ryzen 2700 and GTX 1060/GTX 770. I first thought it's a bitcoin miner, but the GPU/CPU usage in task manager is completely normal. Tried benchmarking with CPU-Z thinking something wrong with CPU, it performed alright. Power settings are on performance what I can see. HDD/SSD read/write speed is normal.
It feels like the CPU is operating at like 10% capacity, which is barely enough for browsers and some simple games/applications, rest hanging up. What can this possibly be, and how do I go about troubleshooting this?
Already tried:

Edit: Solved, seems my overclock settings were at fault.

submitted by Norci to pcmasterrace [link] [comments]

All programs/games are suddenly slow?

Hi all. I'm on Windows 10, and suddenly started noticing that most of my 3D games are really slow (even WoW classic takes 6 minutes to boot up!), as well as software (BattleNet launcher, Adobe Premiere). Slow as in takes minutes to boot up (compared to seconds normally) as well as hanging up with "not responding", and in games I get stutter once they slowly booted up. The entire OS feels sluggish tbh, but it's like PC barely manages to run it without bigger hick-ups, but chokes on games. Even restarting system is slow, despite it being on SSD.
I'm on a Ryzen 2700 and GTX 1060/GTX 770. I first thought it's a bitcoin miner, but the GPU/CPU usage in task manager is completely normal. Tried benchmarking with CPU-Z thinking something wrong with CPU, it performed alright. Power settings are on performance what I can see. HDD read/write speed is normal.
It feels like the CPU is operating at like 10% capacity, which is enough only for browsers and some simple games, rest hanging up. What can this possibly be, and how do I go about troubleshooting this?
Weirdly enough, system seems to run fine in safe mode.
Already tried:

edit: Solved, it was my overclock settings.

submitted by Norci to techsupport [link] [comments]

Smartphone cpu performance vs x86 CPUs, are smartphone comparable to entry level desktop/netbook/laptop cpu?

Today i was using the geekbench 3 browser to go through the performances of the various snapdragon models (using the list of devices) and when i arrived to the last octa core models i observed that those had more points than intel x86 cpu (for example the atom z3580).
Then i searched for normal intel cpu (desktop/laptop) and i saw that while the octa core snapdragon or exynos were around 5000 points many x86 cpus were not. Heck i thought that a pentium 3 1ghz (from 2000) was still faster than smartphone CPUs for non-trivial computations!
I'm aware that instruction sets are different, ad hoc processing is different too. For example certain ASICs are monstrous for md5 hash (see bitcoin farms), GPUs are great for certain type of parallel computing, while x86 "normal" CPUs are better at something else. So i searched some benchmark that could really squeeze the processing power of general purposes CPU doing some intensive task that comes from real world problems (so math, physics, etc.).
For example computing primes, computing a fractal, testing on sorting algorithms and so on, computing rsa/hashes (for example for crypted transmissions), etc.
Unfortunately i did not find anything of the sort, so, does someone else knows if actual smartphone CPUs are really on par with relatively old desktop/laptop CPUs (even just entry level)?
The only similar "intensive" situation that i can compare is when i play certain games (ex: racing) that i played also long ago on desktop computers, but the comparison is not really fair because it includes GPU abilities, memory, storage (if the app is big) and most importantly the game itself.
edit: people in the thread mention contemporary desktop solution. I think is unlikely that a system on a chip from 2015 can compete with an Intel/amd from 2015. I was meaning more like: does a system on a chip in smartphones of 2016 can outrun x86 CPUs from 2004 for meaningful tasks (math, physics, running webservers, etc.)? CPU from 2006? 2008? etc...
edit2: another interesting perspective is to use embedded computers based on Soc, like raspberry. I may ask in /raspberry and then see how the raspberry compare with SoC in smartphones.
edit3: i just remember that long ago i looked at the top500.org, they used linpack to test clusters. So i searched for linkpack again and i found a guy that is very fond in tests (great job!). Of course i did not test all the available cpu but to have an idea is ok:
http://www.roylongbottom.org.uk/linpack%20results.htm
In brief for single precision on 100x100 problems: The fastest arm tops at 1400 Mflops, while quite decent desktop x86 cpu are around 1800 Mflops.
Of course there are many gaps: which generation of CPU? When? Etc... But the idea is that a snapdragon could be as similar as a 2.4ghz core 2 duo of some years ago (that is nothing poor, it still pretty useful as cpu i would say), with a massive test (optimized or not) is quite surprising.
I would have expected the snapdragon 800 to be 20 times slower or more of a relatively old core 2 due CPU for a linpack test.
submitted by pier4r to Android [link] [comments]

Skywire Testnet FAQ Update (July, 2018)

Please keep in mind that this will be an evolving FAQ and a living document as we progress through our testnet, so check back here often for updates.

General Information

What is the objective of the Skywire Public Testnet?

There are several goals we will accomplish with the Skywire Public Testnet. The testnet will be split into several phases. The version running today is the internal version of our testnet, aimed to validate its function and performance. The coming revision will publicize the network, as well as establish a fair economic model reward mechanism for running nodes. This will be based upon analysis of node utilization during testing. This testing will provide us valuable information to design a robust mathematical model for the mainnet so that all nodes on the mainnet will be automatically incentivized under a fair economic model.

What is the function of this version?

Once a user sets up an operational node, they will be able to search for other nodes and be connected to users around the world, breaking down borders and barriers to access global information.
Note that any computer can become a node on the network, however, only whitelisted Skyminers (all Official and selected DIY) will be participating in the economic model testing program, and eligible for rewards.

What kind of Skyminers will be whitelisted for the Testnet?

There are three main categories of Skyminers:
The initial whitelist will include the Official Skyminers that have shipped to users around the globe. These will become the baseline for early DIY Skyminers. Since we are entering into uncharted skies, we want to initially reduce any variables possible and test the network in a controlled manner.
We have already been scaling out to include high quality DIY Skyminers with equivalent specifications, and eventually any Skyminer (official or DIY) that reaches the minimum specifications required. Those minimum specifications will be determined during the testnet and released to the Skyfleet community as they become available so stay tuned.

What will be the whitelisting process be like?

First, the Skywire core team will collect the public keys for each node within each Official Skyminer. Since there are 8 nodes in a Skyminer, each will have 8 public keys. These Official Skyminers will be whitelisted once public keys are provided to the Skywire core team.
Here is a link to the whitelist submission page
DIY Skyminers will be reviewed manually and approved weekly (approximately 50 per week) following the completion of the whitelisting process for the Official Skyminers.

Can DIY Skyminers join the whitelist?

While Official Skyminers will be on the whitelist by default (upon submission and receipt of their public keys), DIY Skyminers will be allowed to join the whitelist based on the benchmark set by the Official Skyminer’s hardware configuration. DIY Skyminers will be required to provide detailed specifications and photos, submitted to the corresponding team for review. Qualified DIY Skyminers will be added into the testnet whitelist. Please remember that only selected DIY miners will be whitelisted. You may refer to the Skywire community on Telegram or the community Skywug forum for more discussions around this topic.
The first generation Offiicial Skyminer hardware configuration is as follows:
8 hardware nodes made up of 8 Orange Pi Prime PCB boards
8+1 100Mbps router (custom 16-port OpenWRT in production)
16GB RAM (8 x 2GB DDR3)
ARM Cortex-A53 CPU
Hexa-core Mali450 GPU
LAN Bandwidth: 8 x 1000Mbps
64-bit Linux (Alpine Linux)

What kind of hardware will be able to participate in the Testnet?

Any computer can be added to the Skywire Public Testnet, set up as a node, and use the functions of Skywire. However, only a limited number of machines will be whitelisted (including Official Skyminers and some DIY Skyminers as noted above) and receive rewards during the testing stage.
Machines not on the whitelist will still be able to participate in the network and access the full service of the network, however they will not receive rewards.

Is a dedicated router part of the required spec? For example, if someone builds a miner that meets spec with 8 nodes and a switch, but just has it connected directly to their home/ISP Router will they be whitelisted?

They could be whitelisted. Official miner is just a benchmark and DIY Skyminer doesn’t require the exact same setup as the benchmark.

Is there any difference between Official Skyminers and DIY Skyminers?

In the current testnet, only ONE miner is allowed to be whitelisted per IP address. In the future when rewards is proportional to the bandwidth you are producing for the network, any rewards is directly tied to the bandwidth you are producing so you may have any number of miners as you want with a single IP address.

How do I setup the software for my Official Skyminer?

We have simplified the process of setting up a Skyminer by creating a Skywire software package image for users to directly flash to their SD cards. The image contains all the standard functions that the nodes will need to get started with Skywire, such as the operating environment, static IP address, auto-start function, etc.
Please visit the Skywire Github for a detail tutorial on the software set up process.

How do we join the Testnet?

Those who have previously installed a version of Skywire can update directly in the software. (Note: if the update fails, please reinstall it by following the instructions on Github: https://github.com/skycoin/skywire).
Please remember that only whitelisted miner will receive rewards at this stage. However, you can still access the same VPN functions with Skywire along with everyone else!

What do we do after installation?

It is simple! All you have to do is keep the node online so that other Skywire nodes can connect to yours, as we perform network tests and do all the heavy lifting from our end. Grab a drink, sit back, relax and enjoy using the new internet :).

Economics

What will be the reward mechanism for running nodes?

At the moment, whitelisted miners will require a minimum of 75% up time per month to receive that month's rewards. The reward ratio will be set carefully going forward. We will first need a rigorous dataset as a point of reference and will be adjusting the rate continuously throughout the process as the economic model gets established.
It is important to note that in the current testnet, Skycoin is rewarded independent to bandwidth production of your miner. In the future, Coin Hours will be earned instead of Skycoin depending on the bandwidth you are providing to the Skywire network.

Do we get extra rewards for maintaining >75% up-time?

No you will not. Everyone who maintain >75% up-time will receive the same rewards.

What is the mining rewards?

For the first month, the rewards was set as 96 SKY per official miner and 6 SKY per node up to 48 SKY for DIY miners. As we figure out the most optimal economics to incentivise a global meshnet of hardware infrastructure for this new internet, this number will change depending on the growth of our network.

Does Skyminer mine Coin Hours?

Coin Hours is a separate currency produced by Skycoin. Each Skycoin produce 1 Coin Hour every hour. Coin Hour will be used in the future to pay for transactions in the Skycoin economy such as Skywire and Kitty Cash accessories. Once we move onto the main net, Skyminer will produce Coin Hour instead.

How often does the whitelist uptime monitoring refreshes?

It refreshes at the beginning of every month.

Do we need to be whitelisted once we move to the mainnet?

No. Anyone is free to join and start earning by contributing valuable resources (bandwidth, storage and computation) once we are on the mainnet.

Technical

When I visit 192.168.0.1 on my browser, I see my own home's router instead of the miner's router. How do I fix this?

There is a conflict in the LAN configuration between your home's router and the Skyminer's router. You need to change the miner's router IP to another IP address OR you can change the miner's router into your own network switch

Is Skycoin node the same as Skywire node?

No. They are a completely separate and independent decentralised network. Skywire node is responsible for sending, receiving and transmitting data. Skycoin node is only for validating transactions and the state of the blockchain much like Bitcoin nodes.

Do I need to leave my computer on once I have configured my Skyminer properly?

No you do not. As long as your home's internet modem is still turned on and providing bandwidth to the router and CPU boards on your Skyminer, your own personal computer doesn't need to be left on. That's the idea of having an independent purpose-built Skyminer.

My Skyminer was turned off because my power went out, will I need to re-register on the whitelist and lose my rewards?

No. All you need is to maintain a >75% up time as shown on the discovery address (http://discovery.skycoin.net:8001/)

Will I need to reflash if my miner was shut off?

No you will not. Installing Skywire on a Pi is like installing a program on your personal computer. You don't need to reinstall the program every time you turned off your computer.

Will changing the router affect my node's public key?

No it will not. The public key is attached to the software installed on the Pi. If you reinstall the program (eg. reflashing) then you will have a new set of public keys. If you have reflashed after submitting your public keys on the whitelist, you have to contact us to change you public keys otherwise you will not receive your rewards.

I can't log on to the router of my official Skyminer.

Ensure all the networking cables are attached correctly, turn off any wifi and VPN on your computer, ping 192.168.0.1 via the Windows or Mac command prompt interface. If you are able to ping your router than please wait 2 minutes and try again. Contact our community managers for support for more help on the Skywire Telegram

I have set my Skyminer's router's address on WLAN as 192.168.2.104. However, when I tried to access 192.168.2.104:8000 via another computer I am unable to connect?

Port 8000 is an address set for the Manager node's board. It isn't part of the router's address. If you haven't set up the port forwarding correctly, when you try to access from another LAN network (outside of the Skyminer's own LAN), you will not be able to connect to the miner's router. If you are uncertain about how to set up portfowarding rules, contact our helpful Skywire community managers for more support.

What cables do I need for the Miner's WAN port?

The same as your home's internet cable. We recommend CAT 5e or better cables.

I successfully used Skywire to access the internet by using the bandwidth provided by another peer. However after a while, I was unable to continue using the connection and have to reconnect, why is that?

This is normal. If there is a period of bandwidth inactivity, the connection will disconnect automatically. Another reason is that the peer you have connected to is providing a sub-par connection.

How do I know what my mining nodes' IP addresses are?

Enter the Skywire manager interface installed on the Manager node, turn on 'Terminal', and enter the prompt "ifconfig" in the command prompt. It will return with the IP of that exact node you are accessing.

The green lights on all 8 boards are lit. Why do I only see 7 nodes on my Skywire Manager interface?

First check if all 8 lights are lit on the miner's router. If not then check all connections are properly installed. Then use the "ifconfig" method mentioned above to identify exactly which board is not connected. Restart and reflash that SD card and try again.

If someone else has connected to my node, can I be hacked by them?

No they can't. Due to the restrictions set up in the software code, peers are not able to visit anywhere outside of the node they are connected to.
__

Where can we learn more about Skywire and join the discussions?

Chinese community:
Follow Skycoin China official Wechat Account - “SkycoinFans”, and join our Wechat discussion group
Join Skywire Chinese Telegram community: https://t.me/SkywireCN
Global community:
Join Skywire official Telegram community: https://t.me/skywire
Join Skywug forum: https://skywug.net/forum/Forum-Skywire
submitted by ChocolateyLab to skycoin [link] [comments]

[Build Complete] Project Phenom is back with v2 - Modded Corsair 300R

Project Phenom is back, this time being cleaner, better, and faster. For those of you who haven't seen v1 (with the original build log), it is located here.
I spent some time upgrading my GPU's, motherboard, fixing my cable management, adding a few aesthetic changes, incorporating my AC network adapter inside my build, and finishing up my entire battlestation.
Please let me know what you guys think of the new look, benchmarks, and setup.
[Notice regarding post: Removed and reposted twice as first time it was not public and second time it was [Build ready] instead of [Build complete]. Mods are notified of this.]
Images:
Here are the desktop images.
Here is my battlestation.
Benchmarks (GPU/CPU temps taken at ambient room temp 64 Degrees/17.7 C):
3DMark: http://www.3dmark.com/3dm/2287893
3DMark 11: http://www.3dmark.com/3dm11/7871080?
Unigine Heaven benchmark 4.0: http://i.imgur.com/FEasxur.png
Geek Bench: http://browser.primatelabs.com/geekbench3/363927
Cinebench: http://i.imgur.com/HCSINRi.png
GPU temps I achieved at these fan speeds:
100% Fan usage
GPU 1: 69C
GPU 2: 66C
75% Fan usage
GPU 1: 81C
GPU 2: 75C
50% Fan usage
GPU 1: 78C
GPU 2: 75C
CPU temps I achieved (according to RealTemp, if I read it correctly. Picked highest temp in both min/max):
34C min
71C load
Few interesting features:
  1. Everything is linked together with Corsair link. (For those of you who are unaware of what it is, it detects almost every component in your build, and lets you control most of them, while showcasing the temps.) This is provided by the Corsair AX760i PSU + H100i)
  2. I have remote controlled lighting installed. [Ghetto mounted under PSU, cant be seen after side window is put back on, however. Just the IR receiver. ;) ]
  3. LCD Touch screen fan controller.
  4. Multi SD card slot, with front red LED strip control scroll switch.
  5. Sound dampening foam installed where ever possible.
  6. Dust filters on the front, sides, and bottom. + Optional magnetic dust filter for top, specifically for 300R.
  7. Custom cut full clear side window on Corsair 300R.
  8. Custom laser etched name + signature.
  9. Custom designed braided cables.
Notes:
One of the biggest reasons why I have changed the motherboard ( and somewhat ruined my color scheme) is because the UD4H failed on me TWICE. For whatever reason, it was not capable of basic overclocking and the bios had failed on me, prompting me to take apart my build and replacing it twice. Not a fun experience, but now having the asrock motherboard, I have had nothing but a positive experience. In my last build I had the last generation z77 asrock mobo and also had a great experience with it. Not the best looking motherboard, but in terms of performance and features, it is comparable to some of the highest end (and most expensive) out there.
As for the graphics cards change, I sold them off in the bitcoin rush and made a decent profit. Not only for this reason, however. After doing some benchmarking and listening to the users here, I found out my gpu's to be way too close and hence not being able to cool down properly. Luckily I got my GPU's during a sale with all 3 nvidia games each, which I sold for a overall gpu discount.
Finally, those of you who are wondering how I got some cheap components (some free), none of them are used/refurbs. All brand new. Just got them at great deals. I kept this list pretty accurate. If any of you are looking to find a particular component of mine in the "other" section in the PCPP list below, just click on the direct link to PCPP's website, that is where you will be able to see the component links.
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks
Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i7-4770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor Purchased For $279.99
CPU Cooler Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler Purchased For $98.99
Thermal Compound Antec Formula 7 Nano Diamond 4g Thermal Paste Purchased For $8.36
Motherboard ASRock Z87 Extreme4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard Purchased For $117.99
Memory Patriot Viper 3 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR3-2133 Memory Purchased For $245.76
Storage Samsung 840 EVO 250GB 2.5" Solid State Disk Purchased For $164.99
Storage Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive Purchased For $14.83
Storage Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive Purchased For $85.35
Video Card PNY GeForce GTX 770 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) Purchased For $252.83
Video Card PNY GeForce GTX 770 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) Purchased For $252.83
Wireless Network Adapter Netgear A6200-100NAS 802.11a/b/g/n/ac USB 2.0 Wi-Fi Adapter Purchased For $48.62
Case Corsair Carbide Series 300R Windowed ATX Mid Tower Case Purchased For $80.00
Case Fan Corsair Air Series SP120 Quiet Edition 37.9 CFM 120mm Fan Purchased For $14.99
Case Fan Corsair Air Series SP120 Quiet Edition (2-Pack) 37.9 CFM 120mm Fans Purchased For $27.99
Case Fan Noctua NF-P14 FLX 65.0 CFM 140mm Fan Purchased For $21.25
Case Fan Noctua NF-P14 FLX 65.0 CFM 140mm Fan Purchased For $21.25
Power Supply Corsair 760W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply Purchased For $132.99
Optical Drive LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer Purchased For $50.00
Operating System Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate Full (32/64-bit) Purchased For $0.00
Monitor AOC i2367Fh 60Hz 23.0" Monitor Purchased For $105.24
Monitor AOC i2367Fh 60Hz 23.0" Monitor Purchased For $104.25
Monitor Acer H236HL bid 60Hz 23.0" Monitor Purchased For $104.47
Keyboard Alienware TactX Wired Gaming Keyboard Purchased For $71.39
Mouse Razer Mamba 2012 Elite Wireless Laser Mouse Purchased For $103.94
Speakers Logitech LS21 7W 2.1ch Speakers Purchased For $0.00
Headphones Audio-Technica ATH-ANC9 Headphones Purchased For $148.00
Headphones Sennheiser HD 598 Headphones Purchased For $161.12
Headphones Sennheiser HD 558 Headphones Purchased For $97.18
Other NXZT Sentry 2 Purchased For $20.98
Other Corsair 300R Grommets Purchased For $15.99
Other KingWin Multi-Function LCD Fan Controller Panel with USB 3.0 and Hub Cooling FPX-004 Purchased For $38.15
Other DEMCiflex Corsair Carbide 300R Magnetic Dust / Fan Filter Set - 4 Piece Purchased For $44.99
Other Corsair Professional Individually sleeved DC Cable Kit, Type 3 (Generation 2), METALLIC GRAPHITE Purchased For $57.13
Other BitFenix Alchemy Connect™ 30 Red LED Light Strip Purchased For $32.99
Other 5M 5050 RGB SMD LED Waterproof Flexible Strip 300 LEDs + 44 Key IR Remote Purchased For $16.98
Other Custom Etched "Project Phenom & Signature" Clear side panel w/ misc accessories Purchased For $59.18
Other Sonic Barrier 1/2 Acoustic Foam w/PSA 18x24 Purchased For $9.97
Other UtechSmart 7-Port Superspeed USB 3.0 PCI-E Express Expansion Card with 5V 4-Pin Power Connector Purchased For $29.99
Other Custom Designed 24 pin, 2 Molex, 8 pin CPU, and 6x 6+2 pin PCI-e sleeved in Black, Charcoal Gray, and Imperial Red w/Black Stripes Purchased For $135.02
Other Propus 380 (mouse pad) Purchased For $0.00
Other NuForce - Icon uDAC-2 USB Audio Receiver and Digital-to-Analog Converter Purchased For $67.96
Total
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available. $3343.93
Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-01-24 04:19 EST-0500
submitted by StaRn3ss to buildapc [link] [comments]

How to Benchmark ProgPoW in 2020  Cryptocurrency GPU Mining  Ethereum  Zcoin  Ravencoin Bitcoin mining via Browser [CPU] German Earn Bitcoins while using your browser. Use CPU! not GPU ... md5 cracker hashcat benchmark speed How To Mine CryptoCurrency On PC And Earn Money  Bitcoin  Ethereum

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